I Have Been to Hiroshima Mon Amour

I Have Been to Hiroshima Mon Amour is a rebuttal to Marguerite Duras’s Hiroshima Mon Amour. The play revolves around two love stories instead of one: one is played out in memories between a Japanese man, who returns from fighting in WWII to Hiroshima, and a Japanese woman, who dies instantly at the moment of the detonation of the atomic bomb on August 6, 1945; and the other between the same man and a French actress in 1959 in “restored” Hiroshima. The Japanese woman (or her “ghost”) time-travels to 1959 to act in a film about peace that the French actress is shooting, and then to the present day U.S. to watch it on a DVD. The play is about the singular tragedy of atomic war told through the personal losses of three characters with occasional yet unmistakable humor.

Joel de la Fuente and Juliana Francis-Kelly in <I>I Have Been to Hiroshima Mon Amour</i>. Photo by Carol Rosegg
Joel de la Fuente and Sue Jean Kim in <I>I Have Been to Hiroshima Mon Amour</i>. Photo by Carol Rosegg
Sue Jean Kim in <I>I Have Been to Hiroshima Mon Amour</i>. Photo by Carol Rosegg
Joel de la Fuente, Juliana Francis-Kelly and Sue Jean Kim in <I>I Have Been to Hiroshima Mon Amour</i>. Photo by Carol Rosegg
Cast Requirements

1 man (Asian American); 2 women (Asian American and Caucasian)

Set Description

Flexible Set

Publisher

TheatreForum, June 2010 (Issue TF37)

Press

“In scenes that delicately muddy time and identity, shifting from 1945 to 1959 and occasionally to present day, Miyagawa contemplates the paradox of remembering a city that—surreally, horrifyingly—one day ceased to exist.”
The New Yorker

Press

Production and Development History

Production: Voice & Vision Theater @ Ohio Theatre (May 2009).
Readings: New Dramatists, Women’s Project.
Workshop presentation: Culture Project’s Women Center Stage Festival (2008).