Visiting Day

Available in Library

When their son leaves for camp, Victor and Nancy are alone with each other for the first time since they can remember. As they struggle to communicate after years of disconnection, time telescopes forward, and what seemed a simple play about a marriage becomes an unsettling and gripping dark comedy about two people who love each other to distraction.

Read Sample

PART 1: Alone-time (He’s gone)

In the child’s room, Nancy is in her chair, reading. Her husband, Victor, calls out to her.

VICTOR
offstage
Hey. I’m home. Hey.

Honey?
He shows up at the door
There you are.

Humid out there. Sticky. Might rain any minute.

It was quite the scene - whole piles of kids – never seen so many in one place. I gave him a hug, and a pat on the back, and off he went. I looked up at him, I banged on the window. He looked at me, and waved. Then the bus powered up.

NANCY
Was it crinkled?

VICTOR
The bus?

NANCY
His face.

VICTOR
It was hard to tell through the window.

NANCY
It was crinkled.

VICTOR
Been in here long?

You brought the chair in.

NANCY
I wanted to be comfortable, wanted to breathe in the air.
She breathes, then looks at him.
Catching on, he breathes.

VICTOR
So…

NANCY
So.
They look at each other. They breathe.

VICTOR
And then I walked home. All the way across the park. I wasn’t looking where I was going, stepped in a puddle.

Look at my shoes. See? Mud flecks.

NANCY
You must have been warm in your suit.

VICTOR
I was.

NANCY
Your underarms are sweaty.

VICTOR
It’s humid out there.

NANCY
Victor.

VICTOR
I’ll go change.
He exits to change his shirt.

Cast Requirements

1 man, 1 woman

Set Description

A child's bedroom.

Production and Development History

Workshopped in Ruth Easton Series at the Playwrights Center.
Workshopped at Sewanee: The University of the South.